BIOGRAPHY
The singular, compelling artistry of pianist Thomas Labé has been embraced by audiences and critics alike the world over. His 1987 debut at New York's Carnegie Hall (as First Prize winner of the Joanna Hodges International Piano Competition) was singled out by The New York Times as "the most interesting among the week's debutantes."

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RECORDINGS
Thomas Labé's growing list of commercially released recordings has garnered exceptional praise in the international press including a "Best of the Year" citation for his debut recording, The Virtuoso Johann Strauss (1992). Click on any of the links below for complete information.

The Virtuoso Johann Strauss (1992)

Transcendental Bach (1994)

Liszt: Works for Violin and Piano (1997)

Howard Hanson: Works for Piano (2000)

Dedication: Music of Robert Schumann (2008)

Visions of Bach (2000) - compilation

Nostalgie: Original German Cast Recording (1992)
VIDEOS
Click here for complete information and links to videos by Thomas Labé ranging from perennial favorites like Claude Debussy's "Clair de lune" to a world-premiere recording of Johann Sebastian Bach's monumental Organ Prelude and Fugue in B Minor in a dazzling piano arrangement.

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THE LATEST
Periodic updates on upcoming performances, recordings,and a list of what's currently on the music stand.

THE LATEST
PUBLICATIONS
As a scholar of the piano repertoire, Thomas Labé has examined manuscripts and other source materials for composers ranging from Johann Sebastian Bach to Lionel Barrymore. His first publication as editor-in-chief, a landmark new edition of Robert Schumann's beloved Piano Concerto in A Minor ...

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RESEARCH
A periocially updated list of current research projects..

RESEARCH
READING LIST
Peruse some of the Maestro's latest reads and even find out what's currently on the night stand.

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SCHOLAR LINKS
A list of reliable and worthwhile links to libraries, archives, composer resources and more.

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  • GENERAL
  • ETHNIC
  • SPECIALTY
 


The French Laundry Cookbook
Thomas Keller with Susie Heller and Michael Ruhlman
(New York: Artisan, 1999)

Quite possibly my favorite among all cookbooks. Innovative dishes, a lively text and gorgeous photography all create a book as interesting to read as it is to use. Detailed recipes proceed step by step through to the final presentation (which often resembles a work of art almost too attractive to eat), along with detailed and extremely useful information on preparation techniques, sauces and so forth..

Julia and Jacques Cooking at Home
Julia Child & Jacques Pepin
(New York: Knopf. 1999)

A collection of recipes from their television series. Lots of great recipes and fascinating insights here. Only the photographs are a disappointment: they appear to be grainy scans taken from the video footage.
Fast Food My Way
Jacques Pepin
(New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2004)

The great Jacques Pépin shows how to prepare amazing meals with ease and in no time. It's worthwhile just to learn some amazing time saving techniques, none of which adversely affect the quality of the food. (There is a second volume out now which I have yet to obtain, though I am sure it is equally worthwhile.)
Barefoot Contessa Parties!
Ina Garten
(New York: Clarkson Potter, 2001)

The popular Food Network star dishes up food for a crowd here. Straightforward recipes with an emphasis on fresh, seasonal ingredients are accompanied with full color photographs. I really like her calm cooking style!
Sauces
James Peterson
(Third Edition. New York: Wiley, 2008)

The award winning 1991 cookbook has now emerged in a third edition and is another reference shelf cooking classic. While ostensibly a book for serious cooks and professional chefs, it is eminently readable from cover to cover, and its explanation of multifarious cooking techniques is simple and straightforward.
 
Jamie's Italy
Jamie Oliver
(New York: Hyperion, 2006)

I first came across this cookbook while browsing in a bookstore in Italy several months before it was available in America. It has since become one of my favorite Italian cookbooks. The recipes are in the great Italian tradition of simple, straighforward food that is all about fresh seasonal ingredients and cooking techniques. Lots of color photographs, vignettes, and detailed instructions round out the lively text.
Enoteca
Joyce Goldstein
(Chicago: Chronicle Books, 2001)

Enoteca are the small wine bars that have dotted the Italian landscape since Roman times. Most have small kitchens (except those that are connected to restaurants) and this book celebrates the light and simple cuisine cultivated to accompany a good glass of wine. For this book, Joyce Weinstein has collected authentic recipes from across the country (an enviable task!).
The Italian Country Table
Lynne Rossetto Kasper
(New York: Simon & Schuster, 1999)

This book is as fascinating for its colorful tales and description of a lifestyle as it is for its hearty recipes. It's the kind of cookbook that reads almost like a book (though it does contain some color photographs).
Bugialli on Pasta
Giuliani Buglialli
(New York: Abrams, 2000)

Lots of anecdotes, history and information surround about 150 recipes all involving pasta. Full color photographs (including all important ones of proper cooking techniques) support the text. The emphasis here is on authentic versions of many traditional dishes.
 
   
 


Breads from the La Brea Bakery: Recipes for the Connoisseur
Nancy Silverton
(New York: Villard Books, 1996)

If you really want to make artisan breads crafted from wild yeast, this is the book to get. It opens with a detailed description of how the bread making process works, what equipment you will need and discussion of the various types of ingredients. Seven pages are devoted to detailed instructions on starting a wild yeast sourdough starter from scratch (I began mine about ten years ago and am still feeding it). All the recipes are complex and involved (most take several days to yield a loaf of bread) yet everything is well explained with detailed instructions.
 
On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen
Harold McGee
(New York: Scribner, 2004)

An 896 page update of the out-of-print original. Harold McGee artfully uncovers and explains in layman's terms the science (and chemistry) behind hunger, food, eating, taste, flavor, digestion, and a whole lot more (even some poetry is thrown into the mix). This delightful volume belongs on the reference shelf of every serious chef!

Two for the Road: Our Love Affair with American Food
Jane & Michael Stern
(New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2006)

Join the Sterns as they canvass the country in search of hole-in-the-wall eateries and engage in some monumental (and not necessarily healthy) meals. This book is as much travelogue as food experience, and some of the side adventures are expecially intriguing (such as their penchant to visit prison gift shops!).

Italy for the Gourmet Traveler
Fred Plotkin
(Revised Edition, N.P., Kyle Books, 2007)

Although not a cookbook, this book is all about authentic food and where to find it in Italy. The author emphasizes finding places off the beaten path and outside of the major metropolitan and tourist areas. In an recent appearance on NPR's The Splendid Table he fielded a question about the large restaurants and grocery stores located in the Autogrills (those massive highway rest stops which line the autostradas) noting that they really did serve excellent food and that the grocery stores put to shame even the most high end stores found elsewhere (and that's where I buy large sacks of arborio and other short grained rices for risotto).
 
Maniford Destiny: The One! The Only! Guide to Cooking on Your Car Engine
Chris Maynard and Bill Scheller
(New York: Simon & Schuster, 2008)

Are you ready for this? A cook book that gives the cooking time in mileage? I can't say I have tried any of the recipes, but the book is a hilarious read. Most all the recipes rely on packing ingredients in aluminum foil, finding a hot spot on the engine and hitting the open road.
RECIPES
Cooking is my favorite form of relaxation and has a lot in common with giving a musical performance - both involve preparation and presentation. Click on the links below to view the ever-expanding body of animated recipes.

RECIPES BY COURSE

RECIPES BY CUISINE

MOST RECENT
VIDEOS
From artisan pizza to a Chinese feast, the cooking videos are coming soon!

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KITCHEN GALLERY
Enter the gallery for photographs and information on some of my favorite kitchen gear. I'm not one for gadgets and gimmicks but this collection I find indispensable. Coming soon, cooking videos!

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FAVORITE COOKBOOKS
FOOD LINKS
A periodically updated collection of some of my favorite online haunts, from sources for professional ingredients to exotic, special interest or novelty food items..

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HORSE LIFE
Horses came roaring into my life about eight years ago and they're here to stay! Whether charging over a course of fences, hacking around in the open pasture at sunset, or even grabbing a sandwich, a bag of carrots, and having "lunch" with the herd ...

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GALLERY
Enter the gallery for pictures not only of my horse, but two dogs and a cow as well!

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VIDEOS
Videos of my horse in action.

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HORSE LINKS
Here are links to some of my favorite horse sites, for tack, apparel and more.

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